Wine production in New Zealand dates back to the 19th century, although the new and modern industry we know today appeared around the decade of the 1950s. Most of the regions where New Zealand win is produced are coastal region bathed by the Pacific Ocean. Those regions gather some specific conditions which make the wine produced of especially high quality.

Although like many other new world wines, New Zealand wine is produced and labeled as a homogeneous product, it is produced in many different vineyards and wine cellars.  

Top 5 Vineyards in NZ

OSAWA WINES

Osawa Wines is a winery run by Taizo Osawa, a wine enthusiast Japanese engineer. The wine cellar is located in Hawke’s Bay, on the North Island.  

Having received an award as the best winemaker in 2006 (actually, the year when he planted his first vines), he has up to 11 varieties of wine. Some of the most renowned ones are the pinot noir and chardonnay. 

TE MATA ESTATE

Also located in the region of Hawke’s Bay, Te Mata Estate was established in 1896, which makes it one of the oldest wineries in New Zealand. Te Mata Estate managed to earn a very good reputation internationally, to the point that now their wines are exported to over 42 countries. This wine cellar offers wine tours in which they explain the history of the winery and the wine industry of the country.  

RIPPON VINEYARD

Located in central Otago, Rippon vineyard is known for their organic wine production with biodynamic processes. They have banned chemical fertilizers and pesticides from their production process.  

Rippon offers many different wine varieties, but it is especially well-known for its pinot noir (quite common in the region) and a rare variety called Steiner.

MILTON VINEYARDS

Talking about biodynamic production, this Gisborne based vineyard received the BioGio certification in 1989, which made it the first one of its kind in New Zealand.  

Since then, Milton vineyards have expanded to have three international brands. Milton is internationally known for its Chardonnay, Riesling, and Chenin Blanc.  

GREYWACKE

Named after the most common sandstone in New Zealand, this winery is located in Marlborough, where around 70% of the wine production of the country takes place.  

Against what one might think, that stony soil turned to be great for growing grapes, especially of the variety sauvignon blanc.

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